Imperial Life

IMPERIAL LIFE….The story of the day is Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s account in Sunday’s Washington Post of how the Bush administration mismanaged the postwar occupation of Iraq. It all started with the staffing decisions, and the point man for this was the Pentagon’s Jim O’Beirne, husband of longtime conservative writer/talker Kate O’Beirne:

To pass muster with O’Beirne, a political appointee who screens prospective political appointees for Defense Department posts, applicants didn’t need to be experts in the Middle East or in post-conflict reconstruction. What seemed most important was loyalty to the Bush administration.

O’Beirne’s staff posed blunt questions to some candidates about domestic politics: Did you vote for George W. Bush in 2000? Do you support the way the president is fighting the war on terror? Two people who sought jobs with the U.S. occupation authority said they were even asked their views on Roe v. Wade.

….Many of the basic tasks Americans struggle to accomplish today in Iraq ? training the army, vetting the police, increasing electricity generation ? could have been performed far more effectively in 2003 by the CPA.

But many CPA staff members were more interested in other things: in instituting a flat tax, in selling off government assets, in ending food rations and otherwise fashioning a new nation that looked a lot like the United States. Many of them spent their days cloistered in the Green Zone, a walled-off enclave in central Baghdad with towering palms, posh villas, well-stocked bars and resort-size swimming pools.

Of course, when I say the occupation was “mismanaged,” this is far too light a term for what really happened in Iraq. As Jonathan Chait says today, the Bush team’s conduct of the occupation “was almost criminally negligent.” Remove the almost and he’s right.

Which brings me to a question. Chandrasekaran’s article is an excerpt from his new book, Imperial Life in the Emerald City, an account of the “stubborn cluelessness of many Americans in the Green Zone” that’s hitting bookshelves this week. It follows in the footsteps of Blind Into Baghadad, Fiasco, Cobra II, The Assassins’ Gate, and a seemingly unending parade of other books about the still (to me) mind-boggling brew of incompetence and messianic ideology the Bush administration brought to the project it supposedly considered the main front on the war on terror.

So I’ll once again ask a question that I asked of George Packer last year: is there anyone outside of the administration itself who’s written a book-length defense of the occupation of Iraq? David Frum, say, or Charles Krauthammer or Ralph Peters?

Maybe that’s too much to ask. How about merely a book suggesting that all the other critiques are too harsh, and things aren’t quite as disastrous as they seem. Anyone?