Todd Palin to ignore subpoena in troopergate probe

TODD PALIN TO IGNORE SUBPOENA IN TROOPERGATE PROBE…. If I didn’t know better, I might think Sarah Palin’s gubernatorial administration has something to hide.

Gov. Sarah Palin’s husband has refused to testify in the investigation of his wife’s alleged abuse of power, and a key lawmaker said today that uncooperative witnesses are effectively sidetracking the probe until after Election Day.

Todd Palin, who participates in state business in person or by e-mail, was among 13 people subpoenaed by the Alaska Legislature. McCain-Palin presidential campaign spokesman Ed O’Callaghan announced today that Todd Palin would not appear, because he no longer believes the Legislature’s investigation is legitimate.

Sarah Palin initially welcomed the investigation of accusations that she dismissed the state’s public safety commissioner because he refused to fire her ex-brother-in-law, a state trooper. “Hold me accountable,” she said.

But she has increasingly opposed it since Republican presidential candidate John McCain tapped her as his running mate. The McCain campaign dispatched a legal team to Alaska including O’Callaghan, a former top U.S. terrorism prosecutor from New York to bolster Palin’s local lawyer.

At the risk of belaboring the point, let’s not lose sight of the extent to which Palin has broken her word here. She vowed total cooperation, and the investigation enjoyed broad, bipartisan support. Since the McCain campaign got involved, Palin has decided she won’t answer questions, subpoenaed state employees won’t answer questions, and Palin’s subpoenaed husband won’t answer questions. Five Republicans in the Alaskan legislature, who never had a problem with the probe before, have even filed a lawsuit, asking a state judge to end the probe altogether.

This didn’t stop Palin from boasting to voters this week, “We’re going to make everything more open, and more accountable, and more attractive to those who want to serve.” (There’s no word on whether she was able to say the line with a straight face.)

State lawmakers will next decide how to respond to those who’ve blown off their subpoenas. Stay tuned.