Party crashers

PARTY CRASHERS…. When I saw reports that a couple of aspiring reality-show participants finagled their way into the White House’s State Dinner, I thought, “Well, I guess security will be tighter next time,” and moved on.

It never occurred to me this would become literally front-page news and the subject of obsessive media speculation. Sure, the political news has been a little slow, but we’re talking about some odd, publicity-craving couple who showed up at a party without an invitation. I’m not entirely sure why we’re supposed to care.

John Cole’s reaction struck me as the right one.

Some days I’ve about had it with this country. The absurd over-reaction to the WH dinner crashers was way too much the last few days, but I just saw a ten minute piece on CNN that treated this like it was an enormous deal, and I can’t take much more of this kind of idiocy.

In a sane society, the reaction to this sort of thing would be for people to say to themselves “Wow, the cheeky bastards” and move on with life while the Secret Service quietly performed an internal investigation. But we are not a sane society….

Yesterday, we reached the point at which at least one member of the House, Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), requested a full congressional probe into the incident. Seriously. Congressional Republicans couldn’t bring themselves to lift a finger to investigate Bush-era scandals, but wannabe Bravo stars crash a soiree and all of a sudden, it’s hearing time.

I can appreciate the fact that threats against the president and his family are up considerably this year, as right-wing radicals contemplate violence. Obviously, security for the First Family has to be taken seriously, and after an incident like this one, it stands to reason that the Secret Service would take steps to prevent the error from happening again.

But if there’s a good reason for this intense media interest about an inconsequential stunt, someone’s going to have to explain it to me.