What Palin and Bart Simpson have in common

WHAT PALIN AND BART SIMPSON HAVE IN COMMON…. About 12 years ago, there was an episode of “The Simpsons” in which Bart was supposed to deliver an oral report on Libya. Bart, of course, hadn’t done his homework and had no idea what to say. He stood up, cleared his throat, looked at the blank page in front of him, and winged it.

“The exports in Libya are numerous in amount,” Bart said earnestly. “One thing they export is corn, or as the Indians call it, maize. Another famous Indian was Crazy Horse. In conclusion, Libya is a land of contrast. Thank you.”

None of this made any sense, but Bart couldn’t just stand up and say, “I have no idea what I’m talking about because I’m unprepared.” He had to say something, so he made up some silliness and got the ordeal over with as quickly as possible.

Every time I hear Sarah Palin try to answer any question on any subject, it immediately reminds me of Bart’s classroom presentation. Take yesterday, for example, when Glenn Beck asked Palin, “Who’s your favorite Founder?”

This isn’t the former half-term governor’s best subject. Palin did, after all, boast not too long ago that the Founding Fathers wrote the Pledge of Allegiance. But like Bart, she couldn’t just take a pass, so she told Beck, “You know, well, all of them, because they came collectively together with so much … so much diverse and so much diversity in terms of belief, but collectively they came together.”

She eventually said, “And they were led by, of course George Washington.” I kept waiting for her to say, “Or as the Indians called him, George Washington.”

If “all of them” sounds like a familiar response, it’s because Katie Couric asked Palin about which newspapers she reads. “Um, all of them,” she replied.

I realize right-wing activists adore the former governor, but her conspicuous unintelligence should be obvious to anyone above the age of 4.