Feel the bipartisan momentum

FEEL THE BIPARTISAN MOMENTUM…. When President Obama invited congressional Republicans to participate in a bipartisan summit on health care reform, he asked GOP officials to do a couple of things.

The president, for example, urged Republicans to craft their own plan, which could be talked about at the event, and from which good ideas could be drawn. In response, GOP leaders replied that there will be no Republican plan.

Obama also encouraged Republican leaders to come to the table with a constructive attitude, with hopes of finding common ground and a genuine interest in solving an obvious problem. That’s not going to happen, either.

House Minority Whip Eric Cantor (R-VA) isn’t exactly laying the foundation for the bipartisan part of next week’s bipartisan health care summit at the White House.

At CPAC this morning, Cantor declared that “we will say no to this health care bill because no is what the American people want.”

Well, the American people want a public option, too, but I suppose polls only matter when the public supports the already agreed upon position.

Nevertheless, Cantor’s remarks couldn’t have been clearer. Less than a week before the summit begins, and several days before Cantor even sees the White House plan, he’s declared that Republicans “will say no” — regardless of what’s in it, regardless of what compromises the president is prepared to make.

Hari Sevugan, a spokesperson for the DNC, issued a statement soon after Cantor made his remarks.

“While Eric Cantor and his Republican colleagues have for months repeatedly charged that the President is shutting them out of the process, today’s comments clearly demonstrate that Republicans are interested only in politicizing the debate and have no intention in working together on reform that makes health care more stable and affordable.

“We hope other Republican Congressional leaders will rebuke and disavow Mr. Cantor’s comments and pledge to work in a truly bipartisan manner. The American people deserve no less.”