Kyl drops the pretense of seriousness

KYL DROPS THE PRETENSE OF SERIOUSNESS…. Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) spoke to Fox News’ Chris Wallace yesterday, and spoke with unexpected candor about the foolishness of his fiscal attitudes.

Wallace, to his credit, raised a good point — the “Republican growth agenda” is predicated on keeping “the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy.” Wallace said this would cost $678 billion over 10 years, and asked Kyl how the GOP would pay for them. Kyl dodged the question, and talked about how great those tax cuts were.

So, Wallace asked again how the cuts would be paid for. Kyl responded, “You should never raise taxes in order to cut taxes. Surely Congress has the authority, and it would be right to, if we decide we want to cut taxes to spur the economy, not to have to raise taxes in order to offset those costs. You do need to offset the cost of increased spending, and that’s what Republicans object to. But you should never have to offset cost of a deliberate decision to reduce tax rates on Americans.”

At that point, the discussion moved on, and there was no follow-up.

To my mind, Kyl’s remarks were every bit as ridiculous as House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) comparing the financial crisis to “an ant,” or Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) apologizing to BP. Kyl’s entire defense was sheer nonsense.

Bush’s tax cuts, which failed miserably in their stated goal of producing robust economic growth, also failed to keep the balanced budget Clinton left gift-wrapped on Bush’s desk. Kyl insists we should keep the failed policy in place, which in and of itself is a reminder of how truly bizarre the Republican approach to the economy really is.

But for all the talk about how desperate Republicans are to lower the deficit, when asked how the GOP would pay for $678 billion in tax cuts, Kyl said what he actually believed: he wouldn’t pay for them at all. Spending requires budget offsets, tax cuts don’t. Indeed, in Kyl’s confused mind, one should “never” even try to pay for tax cuts.

It’s quite a message to Americans: Republicans believe $30 billion for unemployment benefits don’t even deserve a vote because the money would be added to the deficit, but Republicans also believe that adding the cost of $678 billion in tax cuts for the wealthy to the deficit is just fine.

The lesson couldn’t be any more obvious: the GOP’s economic agenda is a pathetic charade. Kyl and his cohorts failed with Bush’s tax cuts, failed to prevent massive deficits, and failed when given a chance to set things right. That one of the Senate’s most powerful Republicans wants to go right back to the policies that didn’t work, and put the tab on future generations, is, as Jay Bookman put it, “both very telling and very worrisome.”