A closer look at the boost in support

A CLOSER LOOK AT THE BOOST IN SUPPORT…. It was largely inevitable that President Obama would see his support in the polls grow in the wake of killing Osama bin Laden, but the first question was how big a bump he’d see.

It’s only been a day and a half, but there’s already some data available.

In the immediate aftermath of the targeted killing of Osama bin Laden, President Obama’s approval rating has jumped higher, with big increases in the number of Americans giving him high marks on dealing with terrorism and the situation in Afghanistan.

But the new poll, conducted Monday evening by The Washington Post and the Pew Research Center, also finds virtually no movement in Obama’s numbers when it comes to handling the economy. That suggests that success on one front — even one as important as the death of the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks — might not translate easily to other areas.

I’m not sure why anyone would find that surprising. Americans seem pleased about the bin Laden success, but they’re still worried about the economy. One isn’t really related to the other.

All told, the Washington Post poll shows the president’s approval rating up nine points, from 47% to 56%. Though it may not last, Obama’s standing is now at its highest point since November 2009, at least in this poll. Just as important, when the pollster asked, “All in all, are you satisfied or dissatisfied with the way things are going in this country today?” there’s been a 10-point jump in the percentage of Americans feeling satisfied. It’s still a fairly small minority, but the satisfaction rate hasn’t been this high since May 2009.

There’s some tracking poll data also out today showing modest increases in the president’s approval rating, but given how Gallup conducts its tracking numbers in three-day tallies, the new poll doesn’t reflect post-OBL support.

CNN also has a new poll showing the president’s support going up just a little, but a more significant bump when it comes to his handling terrorism and the war in Afghanistan.