So much for the ‘war on religion’

Rick Perry unveiled a rather ugly campaign ad this week, condemning gays for being able to “serve openly in the military,” and promising voters he’ll “end Obama’s war on religion.”

The Texas governor talked to CNN’s Wolf Blitzer this week, and to his credit, the host asked Perry to back up the language in the ad. (Ian Millhiser has the video)

PERRY: [W]e’ve got a federal judge for instance in San Antonio that said these kids couldn’t say an invocation in school. I mean, they say you can’t even use the word invocation at their commencement. I mean, that’s —

BLITZER: Is that President Obama’s war on religion?

PERRY: I’m just giving you suggestions after what we are seeing from the left of which I would suggest to you, President Obama is a member of the left and substantial left of center beliefs that you can’t even have a Christmas party. You can’t say a prayer at school.

I’m beginning to think Perry was not blessed with an overabundance of intelligence.

The Texas governor wants the public to believe the president has waged a “war on religion.” That’s a serious charge, and Perry backs it up with a series of arguments:

* A federal judge issued a ruling, which was overturned on appeal, on an invocation at a graduation ceremony. What does this have to do with Obama? Nothing. The judge wasn’t even an Obama nominee.

* The president has “substantial left of center beliefs.” What does this have to do with a “war on religion.” I haven’t the foggiest idea.

* “You can’t even have a Christmas party.” As far as I can tell, Christmas parties are still pretty common, and the White House hasn’t tried to stop them.

* “You can’t say a prayer at school.” Actually, you can. Perry just doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Voluntary prayer in public schools is already legal, and it always has been.

In other words, asked for evidence to support his allegations, Rick Perry has absolutely nothing.

And to think some find it hard to take him seriously.