That Pesky ACORN, and a Surge of Interest in Panetta-Burns

Public Policy Polling clearly decided to have some fun in its first post-election national survey. Take it away, Tom Jensen!

49% of GOP voters nationally say they think that ACORN stole the election for President Obama. We found that 52% of Republicans thought that ACORN stole the 2008 election for Obama, so this is a modest decline, but perhaps smaller than might have been expected given that ACORN doesn’t exist anymore.

Some GOP voters are so unhappy with the outcome that they no longer care to be a part of the United States. 25% of Republicans say they would like their state to secede from the union compared to 56% who want to stay and 19% who aren’t sure.

During the “secession crisis” of 1861 that ultimately led to the Civil War, the crucial “swing” category of people in many southern states where those referred to as “conditional Unionists,” who did not favor immediate secession but opposed any use of coercion to restore the old Union. Is that where 19% of today’s Republicans stand?

Meanwhile, interest in big Grand Bargain deficit reduction plans that we have been told are essential to the survival of the Union remains relatively low:

As much of an obsession as Bowles/Simpson can be for the DC pundit class, most Americans don’t have an opinion about it. 23% support it, 16% oppose it, and 60% say they don’t have a take one way or the other.

The 39% of Americans with an opinion about Bowles/Simpson is only slightly higher than the 25% with one about Panetta/Burns, a mythical Clinton Chief of Staff/former western Republican Senator combo we conceived of to test how many people would say they had an opinion even about something that doesn’t exist.

The chattering classes are having a lot of fun on Twitter as we speak filling in the details of Panetta/Burns. Next up perhaps they can explain the ghostly presence of ACORN.

Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore, a Monthly contributing editor, is a columnist for the Daily Intelligencer, New York magazine’s politics blog, and the managing editor for the Democratic Strategist.