The underlying philosophy

THE UNDERLYING PHILOSOPHY…. The AP, noting President Obama’s warnings about a possible economic “catastrophe,” reported this afternoon, “In remarks at the White House, Obama argued that recalcitrant lawmakers need to get behind his approach, saying the American people embraced his ideas when they elected him president in November.”

The exact quote, which Greg Sargent ran, is worth taking a look at.

“Now, in the past few days I’ve heard criticisms of this plan that echo the very same failed theories that helped lead us into this crisis — the notion that tax cuts alone will solve all our problems; that we can ignore fundamental challenges like energy independence and the high cost of health care and still expect our economy and our country to thrive.

“I reject that theory, and so did the American people when they went to the polls in November and voted resoundingly for change. So I urge members of Congress to act without delay. No plan is perfect, and we should work to make it stronger. But let’s not make the perfect the enemy of the essential. Let’s show people all over our country who are looking for leadership in this difficult time that we are equal to the task.”

It’s not “I won” rhetoric, but it is a pointed reminder. The president was effectively reminding folks, in an aggressive but non-confrontational way, that the very same people who are blocking his recovery package had already their say. Indeed, they were given a chance to do what they’re proposing now, and it failed miserably. It’s one of the reasons Republicans were rejected in some large numbers by voters.

Greg added that Obama’s comments go “beyond the generic call to action we’ve heard from Obama thus far. By rejecting the ‘notion that tax cuts can solve all our problems,’ Obama is faulting conservative economic ideology, and arguing that this ideology is what landed us in our current mess.”

I can only assume that Obama’s entirely accurate remarks will be met with a new round of media complaints that the president isn’t being nearly “bipartisan” enough.

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