Mitt Keeps Digging in Michigan

Mitt Romney better be happy the Michigan Republican presidential primary is tomorrow. If it was much later, his series of mistatements and gaffes and empty-stadium moments might eventually sink him.

A few days ago Mitch Potter of the Toronto Star heard Romney deliver a stirring tribute to his memories of Detroit’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first automobile, and did a little research:

When Mitt Romney regaled a Michigan audience this week with childhood memories of a landmark moment in Detroit history, it was a rare instance of emotional candour.

And, perhaps, an even rarer example of time travel.

Romney recalled he was “probably 4 or something like that” the day of the Golden Jubilee, when three-quarters of a million people gathered to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the American automobile.

“My dad had a job being the grandmaster. They painted Woodward Ave. with gold paint,” Romney told a rapt Tea Party audience in the village of Milford Thursday night, reliving a moment of American industrial glory.

The Golden Jubilee described so vividly by Romney was indeed an epic moment in automotive lore. The parade included one of the last public appearances by an elderly Henry Ford.

And it took place June 1, 1946 — fully nine months before Romney was born.

Yeah, primary day can’t arrive too fast.

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Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore, a Monthly contributing editor, is a columnist for the Daily Intelligencer, New York magazine’s politics blog, and the managing editor for the Democratic Strategist.