Magazine

W as Prince John. Scalia as the Sheriff of Nottingham

The story behind Bushs delays should challenge investigative reporters and historians for years to come. Don Van Natta Jr. and Dexter Filkings of The New York Times have already come up with some fascinating clues to what happened in Miami-Dade, where the recount was off, then on, then reduced in size, and finally, called off,… Read more »

Beyond Band-Aids

That’s what happens when your party tries to do health care reform and it blows up in your face. But these days, just five years after the death of the Clinton health care reform plan, universal coverage is back on the table. It’s not hard to see why. In 1994, the year the Clinton plan… Read more »

Medicine Wheel

Confronted by the same situation a few months ago, the same officer refused to leave. Explaining, “I need to talk to everyone else in the house,” he pushed in over the man’s protest and saw children crouched on the living room floor. “I wouldn’t have seen them before,” he says. “I had to be taught… Read more »

The Gippers Constitution

How did we get here? Twenty years ago the Reagan administration had a conservative social agenda and no way to achieve it. A Democratic House of Representatives stood squarely in the way of the White House on issues like abortion, school prayer, and busing. In Pursuit of Justices, a history of the modern Supreme Court… Read more »

Whose Game Is It Anyway?

When John Crotty and Peter Lyons learned the National Football League’s New York Jets were being put up for sale this summer, they asked each other a seemingly naive question: why can’t Jets fans like us buy the team ourselves? The 30-year-old boyhood friends from New York decided to find out. They created a website,… Read more »

Snake Eyes

HOPE works. It has financed higher education for hundreds of thousands of students in Georgia. It also seems wondrously simple: a voluntary tax (no one is forced to buy lottery tickets) to fund a clear, concise, and universally acclaimed goal. Every high school student in Georgia with at least a B average now has the… Read more »

Americas Real Drug Problem

Frank and Lois Dezelich never considered themselves poor. Frank worked in construction and building insulation all his life, and when they retired they built their own home in Bedford, Va. Then Frank had a stroke, and lost his speech and became paralyzed on one side. Medicare, the federal program to insure the elderly against the… Read more »

How the Democrats Can Win

Did you see Ken Starr’s piece in The Wall Street Journal trying to explain his disastrous investigation? He points out that 75 percent of Whitewater cases ended in hung juries compared to a 5 percent hung jury rate in criminal trials generally. This he attributes to “some people entered the jury room with agendas” and… Read more »

The Think Tank As Flack

On September 18, The New York Times ran a breathless front-page account of corporate propaganda. The Microsoft Corporation, we learned, had bankrolled a California think tank—ironically named the Independent Institute—to run full-page newspaper ads supporting Microsoft’s claim of innocence in the face of federal antitrust charges. The ads took the form of a letter signed… Read more »

Deadly Compromise

In 1978, Robert Alton Harris, a 26-year-old paroled murderer, kidnapped two California teenagers in the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant. He drove to a remote canyon where he killed the two boys, then finished the hamburgers they’d been eating and drove off. Harris was later caught robbing a bank. He confessed to the murders… Read more »