Christina Larson

Christina Larson is a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine based in Beijing, China. She has reported widely from across China and Southeast Asia. Her writing on China, the environment, climate change and civil society have appeared in the The New York Times, Boston Globe, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Foreign Policy, Smithsonian, and Time magazine, among other publications. In 2008, she was named a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists (international reporting). Her profile of Chinese environmentalist Yong Yang will be included in the forthcoming anthology of China writing, Chinese Characters. Christina was managing editor of the Washington Monthly from 2003 to 2006, and editor from 2007 to 2008. A native of Atlanta, Georgia, she graduated from Stanford University.


Seven Mistakes Superheroines Make

Then, as so often happens, Hollywood overreached. Studios didn’t pause to figure out why audiences loved action heroines. Instead, they rolled out a formula that pandered to all of the wrong instincts: Trot out hot bodies in tight costumes, choreograph some fight scenes, and wait for the profits to roll in. The result has been… Read more »

The Joy of Sexology: What to think now about Alfred Kinsey

The event didn’t make The Washington Post‘s gossip column the next morning, but its purpose was different: to win articulate friends. Both the studio and the director knew it needed them. Months earlier, conservative activists had launched an onslaught against the film. Radio host Laura Schlessinger and Judith Reisman, author of a book titled Kinsey,… Read more »

The Joy of Sexology: What to think now about Alfred Kinsey

The event didn’t make The Washington Post‘s gossip column the next morning, but its purpose was different: to win articulate friends. Both the studio and the director knew it needed them. Months earlier, conservative activists had launched an onslaught against the film. Radio host Laura Schlessinger and Judith Reisman, author of a book titled Kinsey,… Read more »

Tour of Beauty

Nonsense, darling. In the pursuit of beauty, American women have variously plumped breasts with toilet-plunger-like suction devices (1890s), strapped themselves into fat-roller machines to press away the pounds (1910s), endured “electrode” shock treatment to zap away wrinkles (1920s), worn wire headsets to pull back cheek waddles (1960s), popped “youth” pills, and slathered on anti-cellulite lotions… Read more »

Movable Feat

Every big news story develops a narrative, an agreed-upon dramatic arc that daily journalists attempt to advance. In the lead-up to this summer’s games, the consensus story line has been: Will Athens be ready? This theme took shape because Greece was, indeed, appallingly slow to initiate the hundreds of infrastructure projects that will be necessary… Read more »