Phillip Longman

Phillip Longman is senior editor of the Washington Monthly.

Phil joined the staff of the Washington Monthly in 2012. He is also the policy director at the Open Markets Institute and a lecturer at Johns Hopkins, where he teaches health care policy.

In addition to writing countless feature articles for the Monthly, Phil’s work has appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, The Financial Times, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Harvard Business Review, The New Republic, The New Statesman, The New York Times Magazine, Politica Exterior, Der Spiegel, and World Politics Review.

Formerly a senior writer and deputy assistant managing editor at U.S. News & World Report, Phillip has won many awards for his business and financial writing, including UCLA’s Gerald Loeb Award, and the top prize for investigative journalism from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He is a graduate of Oberlin College, and was also a Knight-Bagehot Fellow at Columbia University.

Phillip can be reached at: plongman@washingtonmonthly.com


First Teach No Harm

The U.S. spends $13 billion a year subsidizing graduate medical education. Yet almost all of this money winds up producing the wrong kinds of doctors in the wrong places, with America’s most elite teaching hospitals being the worst offenders.

The Republican Case for Waste in Health Care

Conservatives love to apply “cost-benefit analysis” to government programs—except in health care. In fact, working with drug companies and warning of “death panels,” they slipped language into Obamacare banning cost-effectiveness research. Here’s how that happened, and why it can’t stand.

Wholesome Millennials—Black, Brown, and White

Prevailing stereotypes about America’s youth, and particularly about young African Americans, are often wildly off base, either because they were never true, or because they have failed to keep up with the reality of generational change. Below is a selection of social indicators showing ways in which today’s younger generation exhibits substantially more positive behaviors… Read more »

Color-Blind Medicine?

In 2002, the Institute of Medicine published an oft-cited and controversial report entitled Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. The report concluded that members of minority groups, even when fully insured, tend to receive substandard care from their doctors. It cited disparities in how often whites and minorities received even routine… Read more »

To Live Longer, Move to a New Zip Code

Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign emphasizes the importance of physical activity for combating obesity, a point she has driven home by dancing alongside school kids to Beyoncé’s workout video. But another kind of movement may also be important to your chances of living to a ripe old age: moving to a new zip code. Between… Read more »