Stephanie Mencimer

Stephanie Mencimer is a senior reporter at Mother Jones, an advisory board member at the Fund for Investigative Journalism, and the author of Blocking the Courthouse Door: How the Republican Party and Its Corporate Allies Are Taking Away Your Right to Sue. She was a Washington Monthly editor from 2000 to 2002.


Broken-Fingernail Feminism

Then there’s Naomi Wolf. Indisputably beautiful and confidently so, the Rhodes scholar published her first bestseller at age 28, inspired the “Third Wave” feminist movement, became a staple on the college lecture circuit, and went on to counsel the president (and a would-be president) on the zeitgeist of the day. Her success extends to her… Read more »

Why We Eat

Despite the staggering numbers of kids like this who were showing up in District doctors’ offices, little was being done about it. The public schools had long since sacrificed physical education to budget cuts; understaffed cafeterias served students Domino’s pizza to be washed down with 20-ounce bottles of Powerade from school vending machines. The American… Read more »

As the World Burns

The Rev. Larry Wood, a self-proclaimed Internet evangelist who tracks the “divine viewpoints” of various weather events, declared the freak storm a curse on the president for his failure to support Israel. (Bush had recently criticized Ariel Sharon.) Others drew an alternate explanation for the odd weather: global warming. But that possibility apparently seemed as… Read more »

Violent Femmes

In Exit Wounds, the martial-arts afficionado and star of macho classics Hard to Kill and Out for Justice employed Hong Kong kung-fu-movie wire tricks made famous in The Matrix and now standard fare in action-chick flicks. But where the wires only added to the grace and agility of lithesome Zhang Zi Yi in Crouching Tiger,… Read more »

Scorin’ with Orrin

Aanes made a compelling case. Nandrolone had been banned since 1975, and because it was easily detected for up to a year after only one injection, it had largely disappeared from pro sports. Athletes really bent on cheating had much better (and harder to detect) drugs to choose from. Later, a lab in Cologne, Germany,… Read more »