Little Tom DeLays Waiting to Get Out

Tom DeLay (R-Texas)
Currently under investigation for accepting gifts and paid vacations from lobbyists and foreign interests, as well as engineering a political money-laundering scheme in which corporate contributions were illegally funneled to Texas Republican candidates. Received three separate admonishments from the House Ethics Committee for bribing a House Republican for a vote, using Homeland Security resources to track the movement of Texas House Democrats during a redistricting battle, and encouraging a Kansas energy company to believe that a donation to his PAC would get it “a seat at the table” where the energy bill would be written.

Bob Ney (R-Ohio)
Currently under in-vestigation for accepting campaign contributions and paid vacations in exchange for sponsoring an amendment that would reopen the Tigua Indian’s Speaking Rock Casino. Accused of accepting a paid vacation to a London casino from a felon who sought the congressman’s help in brokering sales of airplanes to Middle Eastern countries. During his visit, Ney is said to have won $34,000 off of an initial bet of $100.

Richard Pombo (R-Calif.)
Lobbied the Department of Interior to suspend environmental guidelines opposed by windpower interests without revealing his family’s involvement in the industry. Used federal resources for political purposes, including abusing franking privileges and enabling his staff to take taxpayer-funded leave in order to campaign for Republican candidates.

Charles Taylor (R-N.C.)
Purchased a Russian bank, co-sponsored legislation to fund housing mortgages in Russia. Serves as chairman for a North Carolina bank involved in a money-laundering scheme by two close friends, in-cluding his former campaign chairman.

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