SONG OF HILLARY

SONG OF HILLARY… I’m wondering what people think about Hillary Clinton’s new web video. It’s an American-Idol inspired update on the contest to pick her campaign theme song and it’s getting pretty good traffic.

Personally, I found it funnier than her last video, and actually quite charming in the way she pokes fun at her own hopelessly-uncool-aging-baby-boomer-listens-to-Stevie-Nicks persona. I showed it to my wife Kukula and she had precisely the same reaction: “charming.” But my guess is that we’re not the intended audience for these kinds of videos. Younger people are. And since we happen to have two such people living in our house, I decided to use them as a little focus group.

First, I showed the video to my 10-year-old son Adam. He was eating cereal at the time in front of the computer, toggling between game highlights on mlb.com and Weird Al Yankovic videos on YouTube (yeah, I know, I know, but we let him watch this stuff anyway). So it’s possible that his heart and mind were not one hundred percent focused on my experiment. In any event, his response to the video was: “That made no sense.”

Next, I played it for my 17-year-old daughter Hope, who graduates from high school tomorrow, and who consequently stumbled out of bed this morning at 10:15.

Her one-word response was: “Cute.”

“Just cute?” I asked.

“It wasn’t, like, thrilling,” she added, “but it was funny.”

So, there you have it: the Glastris family’s take on Hillary’s new video. I’ll be interested to see if commenters agree more with my wife and me or with the kids.

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Paul Glastris

Paul Glastris is the editor in chief of the Washington Monthly.