Post-convention polling

POST-CONVENTION POLLING…. A couple of interesting new polls are out, but before considering the results, keep a key caveat in mind: polling over Labor Day weekend is a little tricky. The new numbers are noteworthy, but don’t be too surprised if the next round of polls offer different results.

That said, I suspect these results will be welcome at Obama campaign headquarters.

The first national polls on John McCain’s pick of Sarah Palin yesterday came out today from Rasmussen and Gallup — and contrary to what the GOP probably hoped, she scored less well with women than men.

Here’s a finding from Gallup: Among Democratic women — including those who may be disappointed that Hillary Clinton did not win the Democratic nomination — 9% say Palin makes them more likely to support McCain, 15% less likely.

From Rasmussen: Some 38% of men said they were more likely to vote for McCain now, but only 32% of women. By a narrow 41% to 35% margin, men said she was not ready to be president — but women soundly rejected her, 48% to 25%…. Overall, voters expressed a favorable impression of her by a 53/26 margin, but there was a severe gender gap on this: Men embraced her at 58% to 23%, while for women it was 48/30.

And by a 29/44 margin, men and women together, they do not believe that she is ready to be President.

Gallup numbers from Friday showed 39% of respondents believe Palin is ready to serve as president if needed. It’s the lowest confidence rate in a running mate since Dan Quayle in 1988.

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Steve Benen

Steve Benen is a producer at MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show. He was the principal contributor to the Washington Monthly's Political Animal blog from August 2008 until January 2012.