Who is More Valuable, a Football Coach or a Professor?

Over at BloggEd (note: I originally wrongly referred to the blog as Campus Comment), Ben Yagoda pulls some highlights from a USA Today story on football coaches’ salaries at big D-I programs:

* Fifty-six coaches make over $1 million a year (25 pull in over $2 mil, nine over $3 mil, and three $4 mil or more).

* The average pay for coaches in the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) division has gone up 46% over the last three years, and now is $1.31 million.

* Maybe most startling at all, 66 assistant coaches make $300,000 or more. At the University of Tennessee, the nine assistants earn an average of more than $369,000.

He then points out:

For comparison’s sake, the average full professor at at research university makes about $115,000 and, as noted yesterday, the average salary for the president of a private college or university is $358,000.

Yeah, but when has a college professor or president ever led a football team to a strong enough season to convince both human and computer judges that it deserves to appear in a high-profile game at the end of the year? That’s what I thought.

Jesse Singal

Jesse Singal is a former opinion writer for The Boston Globe and former web editor of the Washington Monthly. He is currently a master's student at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Policy. Follow him on Twitter at @jessesingal.