Tuesday’s Mini-Report

TUESDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* Key 8-1 ruling: “The Supreme Court struck down a federal law Tuesday aimed at banning videos depicting graphic violence against animals, saying that it violates the constitutional right to free speech.”

* An argument over gun rights led to this major disappointment: “In a stunning reversal, Democratic leaders have decided that the House of Representatives won’t consider a bill that would have given the District of Columbia full voting rights in Congress. ‘The price was way too high,’ explained House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., in announcing the decision Tuesday.”

* Another good move from the administration: “Surrounded by women athletes and Olympians Vice President Biden announced today that the Obama administration is rolling back a controversial Title IX compliance requirement enacted under the Bush administration. ‘Making Title IX as strong as possible is a no-brainer,’ Biden said this afternoon at an event at George Washington University.”

* The right fought vehemently in opposition to Marisa Demeo, a President Obama nominee to the D.C. Superior Court, primarily because she’s a lesbian. After waiting for 13 months for a vote, the Senate ended a Republican filibuster today.

* SEC: “The Securities and Exchange Commission is examining whether any of the 19 largest U.S. banks are using an accounting trick that a bankruptcy examiner has said led to the collapse of Lehman Brothers, SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro said Tuesday.”

* Any chance the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland might help with global warming? It’s not likely.

* Donald Berwick, the new Medicare/Medicaid chief, looks like a fine choice.

* Judging community colleges.

* In case Fox News is too liberal for you, there may soon be an even more ridiculous option: RightNetwork. The guy who played Frasier is apparently involved.

* Glenn Beck is claiming to hear voices in his head.

* R.I.P, Dr. Dorothy Height.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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