Wednesday’s campaign round-up

WEDNESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:

* I’m noticing a pattern: Alaska’s Joe Miller (R) keeps bringing pointless lawsuits to court, and judges keep ruling against him. Yesterday, a federal district court judge became the latest to smack down the failed right-wing candidate.

* Though Miller has obviously lost to Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R), he has not yet decided whether to concede, or keep pushing on, appealing to the 9th Circuit.

* Public Policy Polling released an interesting report yesterday, noting the approval ratings of several senators, including most of the 2012 field. The most popular incumbent seeking re-election appears to be Minnesota’s Amy Klobuchar (D), with a 59% approval rating. The least popular is Connecticut’s Joe Lieberman (I), with 33% support.

* With West Virginia’s Joe Manchin (D) making the transition from the governor’s office to the U.S. Senate, there’s still some question about how and when to hold the race to permanently replace him. State Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin (D), who became acting governor last month, expects to serve through the end of 2012. State House Speaker Rick Thompson (D), who’s interested in running for the post, wants to see a special election in 2011.

* In what’s become a cyclical exercise, officials in Iowa and New Hampshire are once again talking about moving up their presidential nominating contests on the 2012 calendar in order to preserve their “unique” status. Nevada is planning a Feb. 18 caucus, for example, which New Hampshire insists is too close to its Feb. 14 primary. If New Hampshire moves up its date, then Iowa will feel compelled to do the same.

* Speaking of the 2012 Republican nomination, don’t be surprised if former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain, a favorite personality of the Tea Party crowd, also runs for president. Cain’s only political experience is a failed U.S. Senate campaign in Georgia in 2004, when he lost in a primary.