Wednesday’s campaign round-up

WEDNESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:

* Democrats have been closely watching Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.), waiting for evidence of his 2012 plans, and hoping he’ll run for re-election next year. Yesterday’s news was disappointing to the party — the Virginia senator raised only $12,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010, and has just $440,000 in the bank. They’re not the numbers of someone gearing up for a major statewide contest.

* Shortly after Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) learned that the Senate ethics committee had hired a special counsel to investigate his sex/ethics/corruption scandal, the senator said his re-election bid is still on track.

* Confirming other recent polls in Nebraska, a new survey from Public Policy Polling shows Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) trailing state Attorney General Jon Bruning (R) by double digits, 50% to 39%. Nelson also trails state Treasurer Don Stenberg (R), but by a much smaller margin.

* Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) won in November, but she’ll be up again next year, hoping to win her first full term. Former New York Lt. Gov. Betsy McCaughey (R), well known as a professional liar, is apparently thinking about challenging her.

* In Minnesota, Republicans are still looking for a top-tier challenger to take on Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D), but former Sen. Norm Coleman (R) announced yesterday he’s not running.

* Former Rep. Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.), who lost in a gubernatorial bid last year, has expressed interest in the race against Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), but that now appears far less likely. Hoekstra agreed this week to become a D.C. lobbyist.

* Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) hasn’t said whether he’ll seek re-election, but the latest survey from Public Policy Polling suggests he’d cruise to an easy win if he runs again.

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