Friday’s Mini-Report

FRIDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* It’s “pure ecstasy” in the streets of Cairo.

* Uncertainty in the near future: “The shift leaves the military in charge of this nation of 80 million, facing insistent calls for fundamental democratic change and open elections. The military has repeatedly promised to respond to the demands of protesters. But it has little recent experience in directly governing the country, and will have to defuse demonstrations and labor strikes that have paralyzed the economy and left many of the country’s institutions, including state news media and the security forces, in shambles.”

* In all likelihood, even the Egyptian armed forces are unsure the Egyptian armed forces will do next.

* Robert Gibbs held his final briefing today as White House press secretary.

* Rep. Jay Inslee (D) and Washington’s state Attorney General Robert McKenna (R) have a worthwhile dispute over Affordable Care Act litigation. (Islee is the one whose argument has merit.)

* I continue to love the White House White Board. In the latest edition, Austan Goolsbee, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, explains the National Wireless Initiative (and makes the first-ever White House reference to “angry birds”).

* Is the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s law firm working with “private security” companies to undermine its political opponents? ThinkProgress makes the case.

* The U.S. ambassadorship to Luxembourg appears to a job that’s difficult to screw up. Cynthia Stroum seems to have found a way.

* I don’t think Sarah Palin understands the “Holy Grail” metaphor.

* For-profit colleges are structurally different from most schools. That’s not exactly a compliment.

* There’s been no shortage of oddities at CPAC, but the guy who argued it’s “logical” for the U.S. government to “monitor” Muslim Americans because of Japanese internment during WWII might deserve some kind of award for sheer madness.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.