Monday’s campaign round-up

Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that won’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:

* Relenting to New Hampshire’s demands, the Nevada Republican Party agreed to move its presidential caucuses — again — this time to Feb. 4. This will allow New Hampshire to hold its primary on Jan. 10, a week after the Iowa caucuses.

* In Louisiana, as expected, incumbent Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) cruised to an easy re-election victory on Saturday, winning a second term with nearly two-thirds of the total vote in a nine-candidate field.

* The latest University of Iowa poll shows Herman Cain leading the Republican presidential field in the Hawkeye State with 37% support. Mitt Romney is second in the poll with 27%.

* Rick Perry is overhauling his campaign staff structure, bringing in a series of GOP consultants who, among other things, helped Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) win his race last year.

* Some of Michele Bachmann’s staffers in New Hampshire quit late last week because the campaign asked them to work without pay for a month. This isn’t a good sign.

* Cain gave his ridiculous “9-9-9” tax plan a touch-up late last week, exempting those at or below the poverty line. Independent analyses still show the Cain proposal would still raise taxes on the poor.

* In Ohio, the latest survey from Public Policy Polling shows Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) leading his GOP challengers, but by a shrinking margin. The incumbent Democrat now leads state Treasurer Josh Mandel by eight points, after having led by 15 points in August.

* Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) is still recuperating, but her campaign committee is spending again, suggesting the injured congresswoman may run again after all.

* Vice President Biden has not made 2016 plans yet, but he’s not ruling out a presidential campaign of his own. Biden will be 73 years old on Election Day 2016.

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