Friday’s campaign round-up

Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that won’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:

* The “King of Bain” video put together by Newt Gingrich’s Super PAC caused quite a stir, but a closer look suggests it also played fast and loose with the facts.

* Nevertheless, Gingrich’s Super PAC has excerpted from the half-hour short film to create 30- and 60-second ads for South Carolina airwaves.

* As Romney’s mass layoffs continue to generate discussion, the Obama campaign is piling on, releasing a new memo from Obama campaign adviser Stephanie Cutter.

* Rick Santorum didn’t fare well in New Hampshire, but he’s a serious enough threat for Mitt Romney’s Super PAC to target him with a new attack ad in Florida.

* Romney’s Super PAC is also airing attack ads in South Carolina and Florida targeting Gingrich, prompting the disgraced former House Speaker to threaten lawsuits against television stations that air the commercial.

* Rick Perry’s new video tells viewers, “I have never quit a day in my life.” As a rule, if a candidate is advertising their willingness to remain in the race, it’s not a good sign.

* Ron Paul doesn’t expect to be a top contender in South Carolina, but he has high hopes for his chances in Nevada.

* Right-wing businessman John Raese (R), who’s already lost three separate U.S. Senate campaign in West Virginia, is launching a fourth. Raese flew into the state from his home in Florida yesterday to file the paperwork. (Why is a Floridian running in West Virginia? I have no idea.)

* For the third time in two weeks, a House Republican from California is retiring at the end of the year. This time, it’s Rep. Jerry Lewis.

* And fake-Democrats Patrick Caddell and Douglas Schoen launched an effort to have New Hampshire Dems vote for Hillary Clinton in this week’s primary. Their project failed miserably.

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