The President’s Permanent Campaign

Presidents are frequently criticized for campaigning instead of governing, but in a highly polarized era without lasting Congressional majorities, the stakes every two years grow ever higher: witness the gridlock between the Democratic-controlled Senate and the Republican majority in the House. For the White House, campaigning does not come at the expense of governing but facilitates the possibility of more effective governing — not to mention the establishment of a political legacy.

Brendan Doherty, in the New York Times.  His previous guest posts for us are here, here, here, and here.

[Cross-posted at The Monkey Cage]

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John Sides

John Sides is an associate professor of political science at George Washington University.