A Man After My Own Heart

Matt Stout of the Boston Herald undoubtedly got some high-fives from his colleagues at that right-wing tabloid for disclosing that Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick told an informal audience he’d “tied one on” in relief after the manhunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev ended.

Patrick’s actual revelation was a bit less lurid than advertised:

On getting drunk: “I got out to the Berkshires around supper time (Saturday, April 20). And I went for a quick swim, and I went to a local restaurant … for supper by myself with a book. And I sat in the corner and Maggie, who runs the (restaurant), asked, ‘Do you want to be near people or away from people?’ I said, ‘As far away as I can.’ So she put in the corner, me and my book on my iPad, and she starts bringing me things. Some of them edible. In fact all the food was edible. She starts bringing me things to drink as a celebration. And by the end of the meal, I was actually quite drunk, by myself.”

Maggie Merelle, co-owner of the West Stockbridge bistro Rouge, told the Herald yesterday she didn’t sense the governor was 
intoxicated.

“He wasn’t tipsy. I never would have known,” Merelle said, recalling Patrick had duck confit, french fries, soup, salad and a “glass of chardonnay or two.”

The story actually made me recognize the book-reading-imbiber Patrick as a man after my own heart. Once in the early 1980s I was meeting friends at a singles bar in the well-known boho precincts of Acworth, Georgia, and they found me alone reading a book entitled Socialist Iraq. Not considering a history of the Ba’ath Party to be suitable material for the environment, one of my friends hurled the book against the closest wall.

Don’t think they had duck confit on the bar menu, though.

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Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore is a political columnist for New York and managing editor at the Democratic Strategist website. He was a contributing writer at the Washington Monthly from January 2012 until November 2015, and was the principal contributor to the Political Animal blog.