Paul Raids the Santorum Vote

I often talk here about the remarkable power exerted on Republicans who might want to run for president by the culture-issues-obsessed conservative activists of Iowa. Maybe that explains where Rand Paul decided to go in reacting to the Supreme Court’s Windsor decision in an interview with Glenn Beck (itself a sign of where Paul sees his bread buttered) today (via Brother Benen):

“I think this is the conundrum and gets back to what you were saying in the opening — whether or not churches should decide this. But it is difficult because if we have no laws on this people take it to one extension further. Does it have to be humans?

“You know, I mean, so there really are, the question is what social mores, can some social mores be part of legislation? Historically we did at the state legislative level, we did allow for some social mores to be part of it. Some of them were said to be for health reasons and otherwise, but I’m kind of with you, I see the thousands-of-year tradition of the nucleus of the family unit. I also see that economically, if you just look without any kind of moral periscope and you say, what is it that is the leading cause of poverty in our country? It’s having kids without marriage. The stability of the marriage unit is enormous and we should not just say oh we’re punting on it, marriage can be anything.”

If this sounds familiar, it may be because it’s evocative of a fine quote Rick Santorum supplied to an AP reporter back in 2003:

“In every society, the definition of marriage has not ever to my knowledge included homosexuality. That’s not to pick on homosexuality. It’s not, you know, man on child, man on dog, or whatever the case may be.”

Since Santorum won the Iowa Caucuses in 2012, maybe Rand Paul is systematically occupying his space.

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Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore is a political columnist for New York and managing editor at the Democratic Strategist website. He was a contributing writer at the Washington Monthly from January 2012 until November 2015, and was the principal contributor to the Political Animal blog.