Roundup: LA School Board Lowers Grad Requirements (Plus: “Coding” Dropouts)

Today’s roundup includes sad news about LA lowering the graduation requirements, plus some rumblings about a possible Senate debate on revamping NCLB and disturbing news about how some districts are “coding” dropouts as other things in order to goose graduation statistics:

 As 22,000 students risk not graduating, LAUSD board eases requirements KPCC: The school board is modifying a commitment made a decade ago to require so-called A-G courses, the classes required to become eligible for University of California and California State University entry, to earn a high school diploma. See also LA Times.

Senate Gears Up for ESEA Floor Debate PK12: Alexander said that he and his staff have been working in close concert with the President Obama and his staff on substance of the reauthorization. See also NatJourn: Sen. Alexander Vows to Block new Obama Education Regulations

Raising Graduation Rates With Questionable Quick Fixes NPR: The nation’s high school graduation rate is at a record-high 81 percent. Why? Because states are doing good things … or using some sleight of hand. [does ECCA fix/address this?]

Duncan: Soon-to-be educators need more time in classroom Chalkbeat New York: Denver Public Schools is “way ahead of the curve” in teacher preparation due in part to the Student Teacher Residency program offered through the University of Colorado Denver, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said Tuesday.

Oregon Opt-Out Bill Could Lead to Loss of Federal Dollars, Ed. Dept. Warns PK12: The state’s House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved a bill that would inform parents twice a year of their right to exempt children from standardized tests.

First lady notes personal struggles in Chicago graduation WBEZ Chicago: First lady Michelle Obama drew on her hometown connections and personal struggles from college and the White House Tuesday during a Chicago high school graduation speech to the classmates of an honor student gunned down in 2013 near the Obama family home. Pendleton would have graduated Tuesday. See also NYTHuffPost.

Student poverty, lack of parental involvement cited as teacher concerns Washington Post: Student poverty is a major barrier to learning, according to teachers polled in a new national survey of educators released Tuesday. Lack of parental involvement and overtesting were also identified as big problems, as well as student apathy, according to an online Public Opinion Strategies survey of 700 elementary and secondary teachers across the country.

Hillary Clinton makes a promise to union leaders: I’ll listen to teachers Washington Post: Hillary Rodham Clinton told the president of the National Education Association that she would listen to teachers if elected president, a simple promise Monday that impressed the president of the nation’s largest labor union.

Weingarten, de Blasio to announce five-city ‘compact’ Capital New York: American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten will announce a compact with five cities to increase career and technical education offerings in New York City this Thursday, and will be joined by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Chicago Teachers Union plans rally amid contract talks Tribune: The Chicago Teachers Union’s scheduled rally Tuesday outside the James R. Thompson Center is intended as a public display of power as bargaining teams continue to work on a new contract. See also Sun Times.

Kindergartens Ringing the Bell for Play Inside the Classroom NYT: After focusing on raising test scores in math and reading, more school districts are embracing play as a bedrock of early education.

Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.