Roundup: Tulane Report Gives New Orleans High Marks

Today’s news includes a new report from Tulane about school progress in NOLA, and more about the new MIT-based ed school being started by the former head of Teachers Collage

New Orleans school changes worked, Cowen Institute says NOLA.com: Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, have New Orleans’ massive education changes worked? Tulane’s Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives issued its answer in a Wednesday (June 17) report:

Ed. Policy Irony: Union Pushes Back on D.C. Plan to Shield Evaluation Data Teacher Beat: In a reversal of roles, the union says that the district is trying to hide crucial information on the controversial educator-evaluation system.

Schools official mistakenly leaks student data in PowerPoint document Washington Post: When the chief technology officer for Montgomery County schools gave a talk at a conference in Missouri a few years ago, he used a PowerPoint presentation that mistakenly included the names and photos of 16 Bethesda kindergartners, along with phone numbers.

Decriminalizing truancy while focusing on family engagement SI&A Cabinet Report: A landmark revision of truancy laws in Texas would give schools and the courts more options for dealing with scofflaw students other than sending them into the criminal justice system.

A Vision For Teacher Training At MIT: West Point Meets Bell Labs NPR: Arthur Levine, the former president of Teachers College, Columbia University, is launching a $30 million project that he says will shake teacher education to its core.

A Soft Eraser Won’t Fix This SAT Mistake NPR: The College Board won’t score two of 10 test sections after a printing error on the instructions for the exam given earlier this month.

After years of reform, a sign of hope for a rural Mississippi school Hechinger Report:The number of Mississippi third graders moving on to the fourth grade has jumped from 85 percent to 90 percent, according to third-grade reading test retake scores released last week by the Mississippi Department of Education. Still, 3,400 third graders could be held back a year. Jackie Mader went to one of the poorest areas of the state in the Delta to see how third-grade testing went where kids are most behind.

LAUSD summer school enrollment jumps 20 percent as graduate requirements get tougher KPCC LA: In years past, the college-prep course load was an option that L.A. Unified’s academically inclined students could elect to take, but now the school board is requiring all students to complete the so-called A-G classes that are necessary for University of California or California State University entry.

Missouri Schools and Parents Are Divided on Proposed Fixes to School Transfer Law District Dossier: Gov. Jay Nixon, who vetoed the legislature’s attempt last year to fix the controversial 1993 school transfer law, has until mid-July to act on this year’s version.

Teacher Resigns After Reading Students Book About Gay Couple AP: NC teacher resigns amid outcry over reading 3rd-graders story of princes who marry each other.

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Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.