Roundup: Labor Strife Over AFT’s “Early” Clinton Endorsement

Today’s news roundup includes internal debate over the early endorsement by AFT of Hillary Clinton, reactions from candidates to the Senate rewrite of NCLB, and a surprise USA student win in the International Math Olympiad:

Unions seethe over early Clinton endorsement Politico: Labor leaders said there was a clear understanding that no national unions would make an endorsement before July 30. But the American Federation of Teachers jumped the gun. See also NY Post, WSJ.

Democratic 2016 Candidates Like Senate ESEA Bill, GOP Not So Much PK12: GOP lawmakers running for president don’t think the bipsartisan Senate bill to renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act goes far enough in restoring power to parents. See also LA Times, Atlantic Education.

President Obama Takes On the Prison Crisis New York Times: He talked about community investment, especially in early-childhood education and in lower-income minority communities, as the best way to stop crime before it starts. And he spoke of the importance of removing barriers to employment, housing and …

Memphis students to meet Michelle Obama as part of higher education initiative WREG: 
The summit is part of Michelle Obama’s Reach Higher initiative, which aims to inspire students continue their education after high school. 

Oakland educators say their success in school discipline relies on shared goals Seattle Times: Since 2012, the Oakland Unified School District has decreased suspensions by 47 percent — a dramatic drop that has drawn attention from those who wonder whether Seattle Public Schools can do the same. On Friday, four leaders of Oakland’s efforts came to Seattle to explain what they’ve done, and why.

Kansas’s Teacher Exodus EWA:  Frustrated and stymied by massive budget cuts that have trimmed salaries and classroom funding, Kansas teachers are “fleeing across the border” to neighboring states that offer better benefits and a friendlier climate for public education, NPR’s Sam Zeff reported. But it’s hardly an outlier.  And it doesn’t take much to find stories of teacher shortages in Arizona and Indiana, among many others.

USA tops International Math Olympiad for first time in 21 years Washington Post: If winning a youth math competition seems less important than vanquishing the Soviets back in 1980, consider this: the last time America won the IMO was 1994. Back then, Bill Clinton was president and Ace of Base was top of the pop charts. See also NPR.

When a top NOLA charter won’t reveal its admission test — for kindergarten Hechinger Report: Jacob Landry is seeking the name of the admissions test the school asks some prospective kindergarten students to take which factors into admission. Lusher, located in New Orleans, is one of a handful of selective admission charter schools in the country.

Biggest Loser if ESEA Passes? Maybe the Next Education Secretary PK12: If the legislation becomes law without major changes before the Obama administration leaves town, there may be an even bigger loser than Duncan: His successor.

Chicago aldermen call on school district to hire more Latinos WBEZ: “We knew the trend was sort of creeping up on us, and I think we were at that point where we can’t wait any longer,” said Alderman George Cardenas,12th Ward and chair of the Latino Caucus.

Paul Pastorek, Former Louisiana Ed. Chief, Joins Broad Foundation’s Education Team District Dossier: Pastorek’s appointment as co-executive director signals the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation’s growing emphasis on pushing for state-run districts to improve the lowest-performing schools.

Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.