Day’s End and Weekend Watch

As it happens, one of my doctors is an extremely competent gastrointestinal specialist named “Richard Hell.” He’s the reason I no longer wake up at 2:00 AM every night with acute heartburn. After one consultation, I said to him, “I have to ask, you know…” and he said “Yes, about my name,” and proceeded to tell me about his family’s history in Germany, where “Hell” is a reasonably common last name. Turns out he had no idea that someone with his exact name (albeit an adopted name in the musician’s case) was a punk music icon. I don’t know if it changed his life, but I’d want to know if there was some Ed Kilgore out there who’s a Buffalo sportscaster or something!

Next time I see a copy of Please Kill Me at a used bookstore, I’ll probably pick it up for Dr. Hell.

Here are some remains of the day:

* Utah’s Jason Chaffetz toying with challenge to McCarthy for Speaker’s gavel; could depend on how McCarthy’s little comments on the Benghazi! committee play out.

* Josh Putnam has an extremely useful rundown on the delegate allocation rules for each state in the GOP presidential contest.

* HRC to be on SNL this weekend.

* Speaking of HRC, Rebecca Traister has a long, wonderful piece up at Elle
about the agony and ecstasy associated with being a feminist watching Clinton’s campaign.

* At Ten Miles Square, Keith Humphreys addresses that great national tradition of expecting employees to work on their vacations. More American exceptionalism!

* At The Grade, Alexander Russo wonders if education reporters are spending too much time on “reform” battles at the expense of other issues.

And in non-political news:

* Georgia favored in Vegas over Alabama Saturday, but pretty much all the pundits are picking Bama in an “upset.”

That’s it for Friday. David Atkins and D.R. Tucker are in for Weekend Blogging tomorrow. We’ll close with Richard Hell and the Voidoids with their signature song, “Blank Generation” at CBGB.

Selah.

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Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore is a political columnist for New York and managing editor at the Democratic Strategist website. He was a contributing writer at the Washington Monthly from January 2012 until November 2015, and was the principal contributor to the Political Animal blog.