Roundup: Clinton Critiques Charters

Hillary Clinton Rebukes Charter Schools Politico: Her comments in South Carolina came straight from charter school critics’ playbook and distanced her from the legacies of her husband, former President Bill Clinton — credited with creating a federal stream of money to launch charters around the country — and President Barack Obama, whose administration has dangled federal incentives to push states to become more charter friendly. See also PK12. Video here.

Mark Zuckerberg Highlights What He Learned After $100 Million Gift To Newark AP: In a Facebook post Friday, Zuckerberg acknowledged increased graduation rates in Newark and successful charter schools, but also noted the “challenges, mistakes and honest differences among people with good intentions.”

The Nation’s High School Dropout Rate Has Fallen, Study Says Washington Post: The U.S. high school dropout rate has fallen in recent years, with the number of dropouts declining from 1 million in 2008 to about 750,000 in 2012, according to a new study to be released Tuesday. The number of “dropout factories” — high schools in which fewer than 60 percent of freshmen graduate in four years — declined significantly during the same period, according to the study by a coalition of education groups. 

Racial Tension and Protests on Campuses Across the Country NYT: Instances of racism and bigotry have ignited protests at colleges across the United States, and social media has amplified the outcry.

Walton Foundation sustains local funding for Teach For America with new grant LA Times: The Los Angeles Unified School District also has relied on TFA, though less so in recent years, when the district made few hires. Currently, about 30% of the local TFA corps works in L.A. Unified, the nation’s second-largest school system. A handful also works in Lynwood.

In Many States, Security Guards Get Scant Training, Oversight Stateline: About 90 bills were introduced in state legislatures this year dealing with the licensing and training of security officers or requirements for security companies, according to Steve Amitay, director of the National Association of Security Companies (NASCO), an industry group. In recent years, similar numbers of measures have been proposed. None of this year’s bills that would have substantially toughened state requirements was enacted, Amitay said.

Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.