Day’s End and Night Watch

That Roys video I played at Lunch Buffet is near and dear to me in part because I lived about a block from the venue at the time. It was in May, a glorious time in Atlanta (or at least it used to be until summer started creeping up). It was a treat to see a band in the daylight instead of at the dingy 688 Club where the doors opened at midnight. I was over 30 then but still felt hip. That would soon change.

Here are some remains of the day:

* House votes by veto-proof margin to ban Syrian refugees unless strict individual background checks done. But Senate won’t take up until after Thanksgiving recess, so maybe they’ll come back more charitable.

* Mike Tomasky explains Roanoke Mayor who seemed to approve of WW2 internment camps for Japanese-Americans was trying to nudge profile to right to run for higher office. Believe he used a little too much force.

* Jared Bernstein defends pending action by Treasury to make tax inversion harder, after congressional inaction.

* At College Guide, Danial Luzer angered by new data showing public colleges with poorer student populations are pumping billions of dollars in mandatory student fees into sports programs.

* At The Grade, education reporters strongly feel presence of student photographer at Mizzou protest meeting held in public did not violate anyone legitimate “safe space.”

And in non-political news:

* Airport workers strike at 8 hubs from LGA to ORD threatening holiday travel; retaliation against unionization efforts is main dispute.

That’s it for Thursday. Since tomorrow’s my last day here, I guess this is an appropriate song to end this day: Blackberry Smoke with “Ain’t Much Left of Me.”

Selah.

UPDATE: Yep, I spent a couple of New Year’s Eves at Rose’s, which got its name from Marty Robbins’ “El Paso.” They served cornbread, black eyed peas and greens at midnight.

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Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore is a political columnist for New York and managing editor at the Democratic Strategist website. He was a contributing writer at the Washington Monthly from January 2012 until November 2015, and was the principal contributor to the Political Animal blog.