Roundup: Special Ed In NYC, Refugee Students, & More

Thousands of New York City Students Deprived of Special-Education Services, Report Says NYT: The city’s Education Department said that its data systems were so unreliable that it was not exactly sure what percentage of students were not receiving the services. See also WNYC, Chalkbeat.

Refugees Say N.Y. School District Blocked Them From Going To High School NPR: Utica City School District is facing two federal lawsuits that say it is illegally diverting refugees away from its high school, instead funneling them to other programs to mainly learn English.

Debate surfaces over how much state action needed to ease teacher shortages EdSource Today: An LAO report argues market forces are likely to reverse the recent trend.

As online Common Core tests fail, Tennessee schools face unknown once again Hechinger Report: It was just after nine on Monday morning when Lori Smith, the associate principal at John F. Kennedy Elementary School in Kingsport, received a text from her sister, the instructional technology coordinator for Monroe County Schools.

How One D.C. Elementary’s 5th Grade Enrollment Highlights Concerns About Middle School WAMU: Brent Elementary on Capitol Hill has a robust student body through 4th grade. After that, things change dramatically. Why?

L.A. Supt. King pledges to bring charters and traditional schools together LA Times: Recently hired school L.A. schools Supt. Michelle King on Tuesday called for traditional public schools and charters—groups often at odds—to work together, pledging to set up a conference where they could share ideas.

New LAUSD Superintendent Michelle King gets earful from Valley parents  LA Daily News: The hourlong town hall-style event was hosted and led by LAUSD board member Monica Ratliff of District 6, in the northeast San Fernando Valley.

Let’s Stop Requiring Advanced Math, A New Book Argues NPR: Algebra, trigonometry and calculus keep millions of people from graduating. And they’re unnecessary, argues author and professor Andrew Hacker.

French, Spanish, German … Java? Making Coding Count As A Foreign Language NPR: Florida is poised to become the first state to allow high school students to take computer coding as a way to meet a language requirement.

South: Virginia: Bill to Notify Parents of Books’ Content Advances AP: The state’s Senate approved a bill that would force schools to notify parents if their children will be assigned to read books with sexually explicit content.

Rising Poverty Rates, Tight Budgets Put The Pinch On Virginia Schools WAMU: For cities like Manassas, the number of students in poverty has more than doubled in the last decade and many of them, like those who recently immigrated from Central America, need special instruction that puts strains on school resources.

Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.