Favorite Music Revisited

FAVORITE MUSIC REVISITED….How do people come up with top ten music lists from their iPods? Several people ? for example, Professor Bainbridge, here ? have pointed out to me that iPods keep track of which songs you listen to most often, so it’s pretty easy to come up with a list of favorites: Just ask your iPod. I didn’t know that.

I don’t have an iPod, but I wonder if I can do the same thing? That is, not try to pick the music I think I like the best, but the stuff that I actually find myself playing most often. Or the individual pieces that I find myself looking forward to when I’m playing an album.

My taste in music is strictly middlebrow Top 40 within the genres I like (classical and 60s/70s pop), although when I went through this exercise I did find a couple of pieces that were slightly off the beaten path. So here you go: a pair of top ten music lists, one for classical and one for pop. Let the mockery begin!

Pop

Stand By Me, Ben E. King
Killing Me Softly, Roberta Flack
Figlio Perduto, Chiara Ferra?/Sarah Brightman
A Hazy Shade of Winter, Simon and Garfunkel
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing, Amy Grant
Twelve-Thirty, The Mamas and the Papas
All I Know, Jimmy Webb/Art Garfunkel
Mrs. Vanderbilt, Wings
Feed the Birds, Sherman & Sherman/Julie Andrews
The Last Resort, Eagles

Nothing by the Beatles, oddly enough, though there are half a dozen songs that could have made the list. On the great Beatles/Stones question, I’m solidly in the Beatles camp.

Classical

Harpsichord Sonata #11 in G Minor, Antonio Soler
Piano Concerto #2 in C Minor, Sergei Rachmaninoff
Concerto for Mandolin in G Major, Johann Adolf Hasse
Piano Concerto #20 in D Minor, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Impromptus, Franz Schubert
Symphony #9 in D Minor, Ludwig van Beethoven
Piano Sonata #14 in C Sharp Minor (Moonlight), Ludwig van Beethoven
Canon in D Major, Johann Pachelbel
Concerto in G Major for Two Mandolins and String Orchestra, Antonio Vivaldi
Sugar Cane, Scott Joplin

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