McCain the Maverick

McCAIN THE MAVERICK….Newsweek reports that John McCain’s advisors think his proposal to send 20,000 more troops to Iraq could actually end up being a plus in the 2008 campaign:

Some members of McCain’s inner circle are convinced the position could actually work to his advantage ? reminding independents of the maverick they fell in love with in 2000. In a 2008 campaign, aides say, the senator would accentuate his differences with the Bush administration over management of the Iraq occupation, stressing his early criticism of ousted Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and the persistent call for more troops. The hope, the campaign adviser says, is that even antiwar voters will gradually come to accept the position as “a long-term stand based on principle.”

McCain’s people seem to be confusing “maverick” with “popular.” When McCain broke with his party to support campaign finance reform or a patients’ bill of rights, he was backing positions that were popular with the electorate. Ditto for fuel efficiency standards and an end to torture. In fact, nearly all of McCain’s “maverick” positions have been carefully crafted to appeal to the broad middle of the country.

In other words, they weren’t maverick positions at all. They only seemed that way when the comparison point was the right wing of the Republican Party. Conversely, doubling down in Iraq is a very different beast: it’s unpopular, it exudes stubbornness rather than fresh thinking, and it looks opportunistic rather than independent.

McCain’s straight-talk schtick has always been a twofer: the press eats it up because it loves politicians who break with their party occasionally, and the public loves it because McCain is taking positions most of them agree with. But Iraq is going to be different: this time McCain is taking a position more extreme than the rest of the Republican Party. He’s going to lose the press because his position seems increasingly bull-headed instead of brave, and he’s going to lose the public because he’s taking a stand they don’t agree with.

For once, McCain is being a genuine maverick. I think he’s about to find out that that was never really what people admired about him in the first place.

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