Friday’s campaign round-up

FRIDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* In Minnesota, the Franken campaign is concerned about 133 ballot that have been reported missing. The Coleman campaign doesn’t believe the ballots exist.

* Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R) launched a gubernatorial exploratory committee yesterday and will reportedly take on incumbent Texas Gov. Rick Perry in a Republican primary in 2010. This, of course, means another Senate vacancy for the NRSC to worry about.

* Caroline Kennedy is reportedly being considered for Hillary Clinton’s Senate seat.

* The Obama campaign raised nearly $750 million from start to finish, thanks to the support of almost 4 million donors. The totals shatter all previous records.

* Florida’s chief financial officer, Alex Sink (D), has become very interested in running for the U.S. Senate in 2010, whether Jeb Bush runs or not. The Miami Herald reminds us this morning, “Sink is the only Democrat on the state Cabinet and the only woman to hold a statewide post.”

* The McCain campaign spent an incredible amount of money on Sarah Palin’s traveling makeup artist and hair stylist.

* Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-Pa.) added his name to the mix yesterday of Democrats eyeing a race against Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) in 2010. Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.), however, announced that he’s not interested in the race.

* Rep. William Jefferson (D-La.), who will soon be on trial for accepting bribes, is considered the overwhelming favorite to win re-election tomorrow, following his victory against a Democratic challenger on Nov. 4. Jefferson will face a Republican, a Libertarian, and a Green Party candidate. Peter Burns, a political science professor at Loyola University New Orleans, said, “If [Jefferson] lost at this stage, it would be a colossal upset.”

* Fred Thompson said yesterday that he will not run for elected office again. Try to contain your disappointment.

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