Blagojevich

Blagojevich

Since everyone else has already noted the salient points from Rod Blagojevich’s Epic Fail — the appalling idea of selling a Senate seat, the utter boneheadedness, the total lack of conscience — I’ll just take that all as read, and highlight one bit of the charging documents (pdf). This is from p. 70; Blagojevich is discussing his criteria for choosing Illinois’ next Senator.

“Later on November 12, 2008, ROD BLAGOJEVICH talked with JOHN HARRIS. ROD BLAGOJEVICH stated that his decision about the open Senate seat will be based on three criteria in the following order of importance: “our legal situation, our personal situation, my political situation. This decision, like every other one, needs to be based upon on that. Legal. Personal. Political.” HARRIS said, “legal is the hardest one to satisfy.” ROD BLAGOJEVICH said that his legal problems could be solved by naming himself to the Senate seat.”

So: three criteria: his legal situation, his personal situation, his political situation. Nowhere on that list are the interests of the people of Illinois, the country, various candidates’ qualifications to be Senator, their judiciousness or wisdom, or any of the other things that one might think relevant to the choice of a US Senator.

It’s just him, him, him. Never the people he was elected to serve, or the nation.

Blagojevich is, of course, entitled to the presumption of innocence. But if the allegations in the charging documents are true, I hope he has a delightful and extended stay in our nation’s penitentiaries, and that he serves as a cautionary example to any other politicians contemplating selling out our interests.

Oh, and one more thing: it’s clearer than ever to me that Obama and the Congress should give Patrick Fitzgerald the job of investigating the Bush administration’s war crimes. Give him complete freedom from interference, and let the chips fall where they may.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation