Madigan makes her move against Blagojevich

MADIGAN MAKES HER MOVE AGAINST BLAGOJEVICH…. If impeachment doesn’t remove Rod Blagojevich from office, the state attorney general’s appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court might.

Atty. Gen. Lisa Madigan called on the Illinois Supreme Court today to temporarily remove Gov. Rod Blagojevich from office and appoint Lt. Gov. Patrick Quinn as acting governor, “so the business of the state of Illinois can go forward.”

One of the goals of her legal filings is to prevent Blagojevich from using his power to appoint a U.S. senator to replace President-elect Barack Obama, who abandoned the seat as he prepares to enter the White House.

Madigan also said she wants the court to bar Blagojevich from directing state contracts and conducting a broad range of state business.

“We think it is very clear he is incapable of serving,” Madigan said of the governor during a news conference in downtown Chicago.

Madigan told reporters that she is pursuing this option, in part because it’s faster than the impeachment process, though the Chicago Sun-Times noted that it “was not immediately clear when the Supreme Court might take up the matter,” or whether the state court is inclined to agree to her request.

In other Blagojevich-related news this afternoon:

* The governor’s chief of staff, John Harris, who was also arrested on Tuesday, has resigned.

* Blagojevich met this morning with several ministers in his home. After their prayer session, the governor told the pastors he believes he’ll be “vindicated.”

* Chicago’s Fox affiliate reported that Rahm Emanuel spoke with the governor on “multiple occasions” about the Senate vacancy. David Kurtz noted, “It’s not clear what this means, and the point can’t be made often enough that it would be really odd if the Obama team was not talking to Blagojevich about the seat.”

* Emanuel has been getting “regular death threats” as a result of the Blagojevich controversy.

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