Senator Franken?

SENATOR FRANKEN?…. The Minnesota Supreme Court may have sealed Norm Coleman’s fate today.

In a unanimous decision handed down just now, the state Supremes denied Coleman any relief in a lawsuit he was waging to deal with allegations of double-counted absentee ballots, which his campaign says have given an illegitimate edge to Al Franken. The Coleman campaign was seeking to switch 25 selected precincts back to their Election Night totals, which would undo all of Franken’s recount gains in those areas and put Coleman back in the lead.

The court, however, sided with the Franken camp’s lawyers in saying that a question like this should be reserved for a post-recount election contest proceeding, as the proper forum to discover evidence — and which also has a burden of proof that heavily favors the certified winner.

Simply put, Coleman is in very big trouble right now. With Al Franken leading by 47 votes, this lawsuit was Coleman’s best shot at coming from behind. And it just failed, making a Franken win nearly a foregone conclusion when this recount finishes up in early January.

The Star Tribune has more, but Josh Marshall seems to summarize the result: “Looks like it’s gonna be Sen. Franken (D-MN). Not a 100% yet. But the state Supreme Court just put the kibosh on Coleman’s last credible legal angle. Bye, Norm.”

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation