Wednesday’s campaign round-up

WEDNESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* New Hampshire’s Bonnie Newman (R), who will be Judd Gregg’s successor in the Senate, will not seek a full term in 2010. New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch (D) said yesterday, “Bonnie has assured me she will not run in 2010, and she will not endorse any candidates in 2010.”

* On a related note, Rep. Paul Hodes (D-N.H.) is expected to launch his campaign for the Senate this week.

* Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal (D) will seek re-election in 2010, but has begun telling state political leaders that he will challenge Joe Lieberman in 2012.

* I’ve pretty much given up trying to follow the developments in Norm Coleman’s lawsuit in Minnesota, but Eric Kleefeld has the latest.

* A Quinnipiac poll in New Jersey shows Gov. Jon Corzine (D) trailing his likely Republican opponent, former U.S. attorney Chris Christie, 44% to 38%.

* Virginia Attorney General Bob McDonnell (R) is stepping down from his post so he can focus exclusively on his gubernatorial campaign. State Rep. Brian Moran (D) recently did the same thing.

* Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland (D) wants to see Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher as the Democrats’ Senate nominee next year, instead of Ohio Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner. “I believe Lee would be the strongest candidate if he were to choose to run,” Strickland said. “I don’t say that to disparage Jennifer. She would be a very strong and credible candidate.”

* On a related note, a new poll shows both Fisher and Brunner leading the likely Republican candidate in Ohio, former Bush administration official Rob Portman.

* Despite rumors to the contrary, Rep. Jo Bonner (R) announced yesterday that he will not run for governor in Alabama next year.

* Barbara Comstock, known for her work as a right-wing smear artist, is running for the Virginia House of Delegates.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation