The GOP mainstream

THE GOP MAINSTREAM…. Given the attention of late on the Republican all-tax-cut plans on the Hill, I thought it was pretty obvious what constitutes the GOP “agenda” when it comes to economic stimulus. And yet, John Cole flags this interesting complaint from Real Clear Politics’ Jay Cost.

Who’s arguing that “tax cuts alone” will solve this problem? Even if some are, is this the median position on the Republican side? Is this the position of the more moderate members of the GOP Senate caucus like Lugar, Voinovich, and Murkowski? How about moderate House Republicans like Kirk, LoBiondo, and Castle? We might count it as bipartisanship if Obama had picked up a few of them, but he didn’t.

Cost was referring to a comment President Obama made during his press conference the other night, when he said, “[T]ax cuts alone can’t solve all of our economic problems.” To Cost, this was a straw-man argument, since it doesn’t reflect “the median position on the Republican side.”

I guess it depends on the meaning of “median.”

In the House, 95% of the Republican caucus — 168 out of 178 — supported an all-tax-cut alternative to a stimulus plan that included spending and tax cuts. In the Senate, 90% of the Republican caucus — 36 out of 40 (with one abstention) — did the exact same thing. We can quibble about where the “median” is, exactly, but with these ratios, there are only so many ways to stretch the definition of the word.

Indeed, Cost’s post identified six GOP lawmakers who, he thought, would be likely to reject such an all-tax-cut proposal. Of the six “more moderate members,” half voted with their party in support of a plan that wouldn’t spend a dime, and would rely exclusively on tax cuts.

What I find especially interesting, though, is that Cost not only wasn’t aware of this, but he assumed that even if some Republicans supported this approach, it must be unfair to suggest that such an idea was part of the Republican Party mainstream.

In other words, Republican lawmakers have gone so far around the bend, they’re surprising their own supporters.

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