Beyond parody

BEYOND PARODY…. Over the weekend, “Saturday Night Live” had a skit showing Republican officials scheming against President Obama. The GOP, of course, was made to look ridiculous — mocking the president’s substantive answers to questions, arguing over whether Limbaugh or Hannity is the “smartest man in America,” and debating whether they should pursue impeachment now or in April.

As is often the case, the line between Republican satire and Republican reality is often blurred — some of the president’s GOP detractors really are nuts. (via Mahablog)

Four Tennessee state representatives, all Republicans, have signed up to be plaintiffs in a lawsuit against President Barack Obama, aimed at forcing him to prove he is a United States citizen by coughing up his birth certificate.

Let me just say what all the world is now thinking, including their fellow Republicans on the Hill: This is dumber than a box of rocks.

Tennessee Reps. Eric Swafford, Stacey Campfield, Glen Casada and Frank Nicely now have a giant “G” on their foreheads for “Gullible.” The four were so willing to drink the craziest flavor of Kool-Aid, they’ve gotten themselves caught up in a national urban legend that has been thoroughly debunked.

What’s next? A resolution honoring the Easter Bunny for doing such a great job with the annual colored egg delivery system? A proposed law asking these four to prove they have a brain?

Apparently, some yahoo in California is filing another lawsuit challenging Obama’s presidential eligibility. Some Republican lawmakers in the Volunteer State, including the GOP caucus chairman of the Tennessee House, are using their positions to not only endorse the baseless case, but also pledging to be plaintiffs in the litigation.

It seems a little early in Obama’s presidency to see Republicans become this deranged. I shudder to think how unhinged they’ll be in, say, a year.

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