It’s not the account, it’s what you do with it

IT’S NOT THE ACCOUNT, IT’S WHAT YOU DO WITH IT…. The conservative Washington Times has a piece today, heralding the Republican Party’s embrace of Twitter. The article suggests the trend is evidence of a modern GOP that’s finally embraced technological advancements.

Republicans finally get it — and have jumped on Internet technology in hopes of dominating it in the same way they used talk radio in the early 1990s to build a following.

“Every time I send out a tweet, I’m throwing another shovel of dirt to help bury the old media,” said Rep. John Culberson of Texas, a 52-year-old Republican who became one of the most quoted speakers at the Republican National Committee tech summit Friday.

Of the 219 congressional Republicans, 49 were using Twitter, while 27 of 317 Democrats were using it as of Monday, according to Tweet Congress (www.tweetcongress.org). The site tracks use of Twitter, a social messaging Web site that allows microblog text entries of 140 characters or less, known as tweets.

Mr. Culberson is the most active congressional “tweeter” and the second-most-followed member of Congress, behind only Republican Sen. John McCain.

That would be the same McCain who recently said he doesn’t know anything about computers, and described the vetting process for his running mate as “a Google.” Perhaps he learns quickly.

Regardless, the Times is very impressed with Republicans’ tweets and notes that “Republicans account for seven of the top 10 most followed Capitol Hill lawmakers.”

What the fairly long article neglected to mention is the trouble Republicans have had with Twitter of late. Indeed, the examples keep piling up, as Pete Hoekstra, Jeff Frederick, and Jim Tedisco can attest.

Are Republicans making an effort to embrace a new medium? Sure. Are they doing it well? Not quite yet.

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