It’s all part of the conspiracy

IT’S ALL PART OF THE CONSPIRACY…. A variety of far-right voices seem quite sincere in their belief that ACORN is going to try to “sabotage” Tea Party events next week. It’s not at all clear why ACORN would care, or what ACORN would do to interfere, but some conservatives are apparently quite worked up about it. Fox News’ Neil Cavuto even “reported” that the community activism group intends to “infiltrate” the right-wing events.

Adam Serwer decided to pick up the phone to see what ACORN thinks about this.

[O]n the offhand possibility that there was some truth to the idea that ACORN was orchestrating the sabotage of tea party gatherings, (maybe some local chapter had organized a counter-protest or something) I called up ACORN Executive Director Steve Kest and asked him about it. “I saw some mention of this on a blog, I have no idea even what the tea parties are,” Kest said. He then asked me to explain to him what the tea parties were having only just heard about them yesterday. When I laughed, Kest said, “Seriously, do you know more about what the deal is here?”

I assume that Malkin & Co. will only see this as further evidence of ACORN’s dastardly plot. Sure, the group’s executive director says he doesn’t know what the Tea Parties are, but that’s just what he wants us to think. It’s all part of the conspiracy.

Now, I’m not an expert when it comes to protests, but it seems to me the Tea Baggers are hoping for big turnouts to suggest there are lots of people who are angry about … whatever it is the Tea Party organizers are angry about. It’s a strength-in-numbers approach. The more people who show up to protest, the more successful the event.

ACORN obviously doesn’t care about these rallies, and there’s no reason to think they would. But if ACORN were interested in opposing the Tea Baggers’ efforts, wouldn’t the smart course of action be to not show up and make attendance at the Tea Parties bigger?

Understanding far-right thinking gets more and more challenging all the time.

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