Friday’s campaign round-up

FRIDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway (D) announced yesterday that he, too, wants to take on Sen. Jim Bunning (R) next year. Conway will face Lt. Gov. Dan Mongiardo in a Democratic primary, and the field may not be finished yet, with Rep. Ben Chandler (D) also eyeing the race.

* On a related note, the good news for Democrats is that all of the leading Democratic candidates in Kentucky — both announced and unannounced — lead Bunning in hypothetical match-ups. Indeed, the top four most likely Democratic candidates hold Bunning to 36% or less.

* For the time being, Scott Murphy (D) leads Jim Tedisco (R) in New York’s 20th by 49 votes.

* Speaking of statewide polls, the latest Research 2000 poll commissioned by Daily Kos takes a look at the gubernatorial race in Virginia. The Democratic primary continues to be very competitive, with Brian Moran enjoying a narrow lead over Terry McAuliffe and Creigh Deeds. Republican Bob McDonnell, the former state Attorney General, enjoys the highest favorability ratings of any candidate in either party, and leads all of the Dems in hypothetical match-ups, though Moran was the most competitive, only trailing by one, 37% to 36%.

* On a related note, Deeds, a Virginia state senator, may be a close third in the Democratic primary fight, but he’s doing fairly well in fundraising.

* How low has the National Republican Senatorial Committee stooped? It’s now trying to raise money in response to President Obama’s alleged bow towards Saudi King Abdullah.

* And James Carville sent an email to supporters of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, hoping to help the Secretary of State retire debt from her presidential campaign. Apparently, there will be a raffle — $5 a ticket — and the prizes will include hanging out for a day with Bill Clinton in New York and a trip to the “American Idol” finale in Los Angeles.

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