Roe v. Rove

ROE V. ROVE…. Anne Schroeder Mullins has an interesting item on an exchange that reportedly took place at a popular DC steakhouse last night, between Karl Rove and Jason Roe, who’d served as chief of staff to former Rep. Tom Feeney (R-Fla.). In terms of backstory, Rove recently trashed Feeney, blaming him — and not the state of the GOP under Bush — for his own defeat.

Apparently, when Roe confronted Rove, it got a little heated, and the two eventually had to be separated. According to Mullins account of their discussion:

Roe walked over to the table, “I’m Jason Roe.”

Rove: “Oh, the famous Jason Roe.”

Roe: “I don’t know that I’m famous but I’m Tom Feeney’s former chief of staff and I’m offended by your comments on Fox about Tom. You guys wouldn’t be in the White House without Tom. And you made these really degrading comments about him that offended a lot of people.”

(Sidenote: Tom Feeney was the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives during the whole Bush/Gore 2000 recount.)

Rove: “Well, I have a file on the things Tom Feeney said about George Bush.”

Roe: “That says more about you than me that you kept a file on Tom Feeney. This guy was so restrained in his desire to criticize the President — even against this staff’s advice.”

Rove: “I have a file.”

Roe: “I’m right here, tell me to my face what’s in that file.”

Rove: “I’ll send you the file.”

Roe: “Well I hope the file is the beginning of the conversation and not the end. I would love to disabuse you of whatever you think of Tom Feeney’s loyalty from this file.”

Rove: “If you keep talking over me this conversation’s going to end right now.”

And at that point, the “conversation” was broken up.

Which is creepier: that the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives in 2000 thinks he — and not the voters — made George W. Bush president? Or that Karl Rove keeps files on those who’ve been critical of George W. Bush?

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation