Monday’s Mini-Report

MONDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* The U.S. decision to skip the U.N. conference on racism in Geneva looked a little more reasonable this afternoon, as a “stream of delegates from France and other European nations walked out of a United Nations conference … in protest during a speech by the Iranian president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.”

* Ongoing concerns over the banking industry gave Wall Street its worst day in two months.

* The Taliban takeover of Pakistan’s Swat Valley has only emboldened militant leaders to want the whole country.

* President Obama wants to see cabinet agencies put together a plan to cut $100 million in the next 90 days. That’s a lot of money to me, but in the scope of the federal government, it’s not much.

* Roxana Saberi is not a spy.

* Congrats to this year’s Pulitzer winners.

* Sorry, Rudy, but 55% of New Yorkers are on board with marriage equality.

* Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.), a senior Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, called today for Jay Bybee’s impeachment.

* Rep. Jane Harman (D-Calif.) is pushing back against the story of the day.

* The latest bank-rescue idea is going over about as well as the last one.

* It was probably inevitable that the right would start going after Elizabeth Warren. Here’s hoping she considers it a compliment.

* Would Obama hire Dan Bogden, one of the purged U.S. Attorneys fired by Bush? It appears likely.

* Speaking of hires, Obama has named Virginia Technology Secretary Aneesh Chopra to be the nation’s first chief technology officer and Jeffrey Zients to be his chief performance officer.

* Nice to see the New York Times acknowledge Marcy Wheeler’s work this morning.

* Far-right Republicans in Florida’s legislature want to make it even harder for voters to particulate in the electoral process.

* And finally, if anyone cares, it appears I’m getting started with Twitter. I’m still figuring out what I’m doing, so keep expectations low, but feel free to sign up if you’re interested.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation