An odd example of political celebrity

AN ODD EXAMPLE OF POLITICAL CELEBRITY…. As a rule, I never, ever write about a political figure’s children. No matter what I think of the parent, or what the son or daughter did, I’ve never thought it fair to comment. The kids are strictly off limits.

But what about when a political figure’s son or daughter wants to be a political celebrity?

I mention this because I feel like I’ve been seeing an awful lot of John McCain’s daughter, Meghan McCain lately, despite the fact that I don’t really know who she is. There was apparently some kind of controversy not too ago between her and Laura Ingraham, which garnered some attention.

But Meghan McCain’s notoriety has grown considerably since. I read somewhere recently that she gave a speech encouraging the Republican Party to endorse gay marriage. Her comments about Sarah Palin and Ann Coulter generated more than a few headlines. A few days ago, McCain said something about Karl Rove being “creepy.” She also signed a very lucrative book deal a few weeks ago.

Today, Meghan McCain co-hosted “The View,” and raised a few more eyebrows.

Meghan McCain, serving as a co-host of “The View” today, wasted little time before getting in a shot at former Vice President Dick Cheney and Karl Rove. McCain, who had previously written about how she found Karl Rove following her on Twitter “creepy,” complained that Cheney and Rove are still trying to be seen as the face of the Republican Party. Last week McCain observed that the GOP leadership is “scared shitless” of the changing political landscape.

McCain mentioned disapprovingly Cheney’s repeated public criticisms of Obama — which he voiced again on Fox News this week — and referred to the DNC ad released this week portraying Cheney, Rove and Gingrich as the ‘new face of the GOP.’ She pointed out that it’s “”very unprecedented for someone like Karl Rove or Dick Cheney to be criticizing the President.” Her advice to them: “Go away.”

This was the lead story on “The Page” this afternoon.

Now, I’m not criticizing her, or suggesting there’s anything wrong with her voicing her political opinions. In fact, I’m apparently inclined to agree with her opinions.

But I do find the notion of Meghan McCain becoming a celebrity kind of odd. Yglesias asked the other day, “I can’t help but wonder to myself who on earth is Meghan McCain?

I honestly don’t know. When was the last time a son or daughter of an unsuccessful presidential candidate managed to achieve this kind of status as a political celebrity?

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